Status Update

1 Comment

The lemoncello is getting very yellow. It’s looking real good!

 

My two Californians and 2 Italian wines have been racked several times and are clear. The 2 whites are golden and very clear. I will be bottling in early may.

 

This summer I will be doing several kits for fall and winter wine production. I know I want a Cabernet Sauvignon, Barolo, Rioja, Chianti,

English: Cropped image of Cabernet Sauvignon g...

English: Cropped image of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes from Hedges Vineyards in Red Mountain, Washington. Photo taken August 28th, 2007 with a Kodak z650 camera. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sangiovese,¬†and several whites. We will see what’s available. Stay posted!

 

I opened a 2007 wine from my reserve section. WOW was that great! When you can make such great wine, age it to perfection and enjoy it…that’s wine making.

Snowy Day to Rack my Wine

8 Comments

Tempranillo varietal wine bottle and glass, sh...

Image via Wikipedia

On this day with snow and ice falling, I decided it was a good day to rack my wine. I have two industrial strength wire tables that hold 3 carboys/demijohns each, so I can rack 6 bottles at a time. I first sterilize each piece of equipment I will use. I place a plastic bucket (from the Must) below each bottle and siphon out the wine. I look for clarity as the wine moves into the bucket. The siphon prevents the last bit of wine to be moved with the sediment in it. I then wash the glass bottle and siphon. I use a standard drill with a wine stirrer (you can buy these in any wine making supply store or on the net. I stir the wine to release gasses. If it starts to foam up, STOP or it will overflow onto your floor. I make note in the cellar log of how much gas I find in the wine. You NEVER want to bottle with gas or it will never escape (unless you are making Champaign). I place the bucket of wine up on the wire table and the empty carboy/demijohn below it. Now I re-siphon the wine (clarified) back into the glass bottle. I move the racked wines to the floor and put up any other bottles to be racked on the wire table. I normally leave them settle on the table for 4 to 5 days. This allows the sediment to settle to the bottom of the bottle. Do not move or shake the bottles or the sediment will go back into the wine. I normally taste my wines as I rack them to get a feeling of how they are progressing. They are getting closer to bottling day and then they can be enjoyed.